Before and After — Number One

The Before and After series focuses on the two or three key creative choices, in terms of composition and processing, that go into creating an image.  Specific technical details about the shot have been left out — you won’t hear me talking about tone curve adjustments and whatnot unless it was a key component of the end result.

Breeanna poses in the late afternoon light.

Exposure

  • Shutter:  1/500
  • Aperture:  f/4.0
  • ISO: 200
  • Camera:  Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III
  • Lens:  Canon EF 50mm f/1.2L USM

Composition and Processing

  • This shot was taken toward the end of a long shoot and the sun was working it’s way down toward the horizon.  It was still pretty bright though, and we had blocked off all the windows to the right with large 4′ x 8′ black flats.  That left one set of floor to ceiling glass and some unusual shadows being cast from exterior items:  a balcony, a half wall, and the steel frames around the panels of glass.  I spotted the arrangement in the middle of moving gear around and stuck with it to try this shot.
  • While I wouldn’t want to have Breeanna stand perfectly straight, I did want her to put as many bends in her body as possible without going overboard.  Hence the bent knee, hooked arms to push out the elbows, dropped shoulder, tilted head…the idea was to offer non-linear shapes to match the rigid internal framing caused by the shadows.

Original:


February 29 2012 | Photography | No Comments »

Before and After — Breeanna in Line(s)

The Before and After series focuses on the two or three key creative choices, in terms of composition and processing, that go into creating an image.  Specific technical details about the shot have been left out — you won’t hear me talking about tone curve adjustments and whatnot unless it was a key component of the end result.

Breeanna leans against a closed metal door near the defunct Seaholm Power Plant in Austin.

Exposure

  • Shutter:  1/250
  • Aperture:  f/2.8
  • ISO: 200
  • Camera:  Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III
  • Lens:  Canon EF 85mm f/1.2L II USM

Composition and Processing

  • I was aiming for contrasting shapes here:  the nice, rigid, unyielding straight lines versus the curved shapes of the subject.  I even had Breeanna kink her body and exaggerate various bends.
  • The tilt of the lines causes the eye to naturally move from left to right.  So the eye travels along that path until it collides with the subject, stopping there.  Had it been reversed (lines angles slightly down to the lower left of the frame), the eye would have traveled right off the left edge.  Even if you start with the Breeanna, the eye has a hard time traveling too far before gravity pulls it back to her.

Original:

February 23 2010 | Photography | No Comments »

Daily Photo – Breeanna in the Window

The Daily Photo series focuses on the two or three key creative choices, in terms of composition and processing, that go into creating an image.  Specific technical details about the shot have been left out — you won’t hear me talking about tone curve adjustments and whatnot unless it was a key component of the end result.

Breeanna poses in front of a window in the late afternoon sun.

Exposure

  • Shutter:  1/500
  • Aperture:  f/2
  • ISO:  200
  • Camera:  Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III
  • Lens:  Canon EF 135mm f/2L USM

Composition and Processing

  • I don’t usually shoot with the 135mm in my home — the focal length, even on a full frame body, doesn’t leave a lot of room to work.  Lately I’ve been thinking more about soft backgrounds though, and how different apertures and focal lengths combine to alter the texture.  I used to just toss on a lens and crank it open as far as I could if I wanted to separate and soften everything around the subject.  But go too far and it becomes a big smudge;  too little and it’s distracting or identifiable.  In this case I liked the colors in the distance but wanted to insure they were abstract.  I also wanted some pattern to it.  The 135mm was the perfect match at f/2.
  • I chose to cross process this shot because of the greens and blues in the background.  While it also added a yellow cast to the whole image, it matches the other colors and goes with the original color of the low afternoon sunlight.

Original:

May 29 2009 | Photography | 2 Comments »